Wakulla County Historical Society

"A morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuable." Thomas Jefferson

Archive for the tag “education”

WCHS to feature Robert Buccellato, author of Florida Governors: Lasting Legacies.

Wakulla County Historical Society Second Tuesday Program
February 10, 7:00 PM, Wakulla County Public Library

The Wakulla County Historical Society’s February 10 program features Robert Buccellato, author of a new book entitled Florida Governors: Lasting Legacies.  This 128 page book with 194 photographs will be released by Arcadia Publishing on February 2.  “Florida has a rich and diverse history, with a wealth of exciting events and colorful characters that form a brilliant narrative for any lover of history,” Buccellato said.  Highlights of this book include a foreword by Governor Wayne Mixon, new insights into forgotten figures of Florida’s past, and 200 years of Florida history covered in one book.  The Historical Society will have these books available for sale at the February 10 meeting and in the Old Jail Gift Shop in the WCHS Museum & Archives.

Robert Buccellato, 28, is a noted historian of the Florida governorship and the authorized biographer of Governor Wayne Mixon.  His second book on the Life and Politics of Florida’s 39th Governor will be released by The History Press in August 2015.  He is a graduate of Florida State University and lives in Crawfordville with his wife Stephanie.

Wayne Mixon served as lieutenant governor during the Bob Graham administration and became Florida’s 39th governor in January 1987 when Graham stepped down to take his seat in the United States Senate.  Mixon served as governor for three days until Bob Martinez’s inauguration.

For more information contact the Wakulla County Historical Society Museum & Archives, located at 24 High Drive in Crawfordville, at 850-926-1110 or 24research@gmail.com. Business Hours are Thursday/Friday from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM and Saturday from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM.

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Do You Need Help Discovering Your Ancestors?

August Calendar

Wakulla County Museum and Archives has highly trained Genealogy specialist to assist you with finding your family.

Call 850-926-1110 to make an appointment.

J. Harold Thurmond & Judge Mike Carter Share Wakulla County’s Rich History

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The Historical Society’s second Tuesday program in January Judges of the 1800s and 1900s featured speakers J. Harold Thurmond, retired Clerk of Court, and Mike Carter, retired County Judge.

Thurmond’s remarks included: H.L. Henderson (1871), W.T. Duval (1873, 1877), W.A. Giles (1881), B.S. Smith (1885), W.A. Giles (1887), C.M. Cox (1888), William H. Walker (1890), W.W. Giles (1891), and S.J. Giles (1895). WCHS member Helen Harvey, who regularly attends the programs, commented that she was impressed with the “spectacular research Harold did to share so many interesting facts.” Thurmond’s humor, teaching background, and talent for storytelling mesmerized the audience. He commended the effort of his “whole family” to produce the presentation while daughter Jana monitored the slide show.

Mike Carter litigated the last case ever tried in the Historic Wakulla County Courthouse (c. 1892) and his remarks began with R. Don McLeod who presided as county judge from 1901 to 1928. McLeod’s famous ruling that a mullet is a bird because it has a gizzard occurred in the old courthouse which has sported a mullet weathervane since it was restored by the Chamber of Commerce. Carter continued the topic with Raney Whaley (1928), A.L. Porter (1932), George Harper (1956), Evelyn Flack (1974), Michael Carter (1983), and Jill Walker (1990). Carter shared many stories of personal interaction with Judge Porter and fellow lawyer Jewell Hudson during his career of practicing law. Carter also recounted with good humor the controversial election between himself and Judge Flack.

Both Carter and Thurmond are active Historical Society members. Program Chairman Betty Green said, “We are so thankful to have people who are willing to share the rich history of Wakulla County with such fascination. We really appreciate their support.” Alongside Thurmond’s family in the audience were Judge Harper’s widow, Naomi, and sons George, Kenny, and Larry. All historical programs are recorded and available on CD upon request in the Old Jail Gift Shop. Historical Society meetings are on the second Tuesday, September through May, except October and December, at 7:00 pm in the Public Library at 4330 Crawfordville Highway. The Wakulla County Historical Society Museum & Archives is located on Courthouse Square at 24 High Drive in Crawfordville and is open Thursday and Friday from 10:00 am until 4:00 pm and Saturday from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm.

By Arkad

What Does WCHS Offer?

Wakulla County Historical SocietyAND MUCH MORE…. Call us at 850-926-1110.

May 18, 1860: Lincoln Nominated For Presidency

Abraham Lincoln, a one-time U.S. representative from Illinois, is nominated for the U.S. presidency by the Republican National Convention meeting in Chicago, Illinois. Hannibal Hamlin of Maine was nominated for the vice presidency.

Lincoln, a Kentucky-born lawyer and former Whig representative to Congress, first gained national stature during his campaign against Democratic Senator Stephen Douglas of Illinois for a U.S. Senate seat in 1858. The senatorial campaign featured a remarkable series of public encounters on the slavery issue, known as the Lincoln-Douglas debates, in which Lincoln argued against the spread of slavery while Douglas maintained that each territory should have the right to decide whether it would become free or slave. Lincoln lost the Senate race, but his campaign brought national attention to the young Republican Party. In 1860, Lincoln won the party’s presidential nomination.

In the November election, Lincoln again faced Douglas, who represented the Northern faction of a heavily divided Democratic Party, as well as Southern Democrat John C. Breckinridge and Constitutional Union candidate John Bell. On November 6, 1860, Lincoln defeated his opponents with only 40 percent of the popular vote, becoming the first Republican to win the presidency. The announcement of Lincoln’s victory signaled the secession of the Southern states, which since the beginning of the year had been publicly threatening secession if the Republicans gained the White House.

By the time of Lincoln’s inauguration on March 4, 1861, seven states had seceded, and the Confederate States of America had been formally established, with Jefferson Davis as its elected president. One month later, the American Civil War began when Confederate forces under General P.G.T. Beauregard opened fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina.

Come See What Is Happening At The Museum

Wakulla County Historical Society Museum

The WCHS Museum staff has been busy! There are a lot of new, reasonably priced items for sale. Great selection from historic book to bird feeders with items to please every age. Remember, if you are a member, you will receive 10% off of your purchase.

Stop by and check us out from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Saturday.

Mary Ann Laird, Gift Shop Manager

Visit our Updated Genealogy Site

Thank you to Craig Kittendorf for updating our Genealogy Site. You can see who is buried in local cemeteries, check out marriages, and obituraries. More projects will be coming soon.

Click Here…

This Day in History

 Dakota Uprising Begins in Minnesota

Minnesota erupts in violence as desperate Dakota Indians attack white settlements along the Minnesota River. The Dakota were eventually overwhelmed by the U.S. military six weeks later.

The Dakota Indians were more commonly referred to as the Sioux, a derogatory name derived from part of a French word meaning “little snake.” They were composed of four bands, and lived on temporary reservations in southwestern Minnesota. For two decades, the Dakota were poorly treated by the Federal government, local traders, and settlers. They saw their hunting lands whittled down, and provisions promised by the government rarely arrived. Worse yet, a wave of white settlers surrounded them.

The summer of 1862 was particularly hard on the Dakota. Cutworms destroyed much of their corn crops, and many families faced starvation. Dakota leaders were frustrated by attempts to convince traders to extend credit to tribal members and alleviate the suffering. On August 17, four young Dakota warriors were returning from an unsuccessful hunt when they stopped to steal some eggs from a white settlement. The youths soon picked a quarrel with the hen’s owner, and the encounter turned tragic when the Dakotas killed five members of the family. Sensing that they would be attacked, Dakota leaders determined that war was at hand and seized the initiative. Led by Taoyateduta (also known as Little Crow), the Dakota attacked local agencies and the settlement of New Ulm. Over 500 white settlers lost their lives along with about 150 Dakota warriors.

President Abraham Lincoln dispatched General John Pope, fresh from his defeat at the Second Battle of Bull Run,Virginia, to organize the Military Department of the Northwest. Some Dakota fled to North Dakota, but more than 2,000 were rounded up and over 300 warriors were sentenced to death. President Lincoln commuted most of their sentences, but on December 26, 1862, 38 Dakota men were executed at Mankato, Minnesota. It was the largest mass execution in American history.

Read more…

Enjoy The Smithsonian Journey Stories

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Photos By Carolyn Harvey (the Wakulla County Mural “Greetings From Wakulla County” is copyrited and not for reproduction)

Wakulla County Historical Society now has our exhibit at the Panhandle Pioneer Village. It is awesome. Read on for more information.

Journey Stories will be at The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown, FL through August 25th. Join WCHS as we share Wakulla County Journey Stories and exhibit our counties history. Please see full details below.

The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be the host of *Journey Stories*, an exhibition of the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum on Main Street series.

The exhibition, sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council, will be on display from July 14 to August 25 at the Settlement’s Club House.

The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is located at Sam Atkins Park, 17869 NW Pioneer Settlement Road, Blountstown, FL 32424. (850)674-2777***

*Journey Stories* recounts the struggles of our ancestors as they traveled to North America and, once here, made their way across the continent. These are the stories of how our ancestors made the nation great – one step, one journey at the time.  The Settlement will be presenting local journey stories and local histories to complement the Smithsonian’s *Journey Stories* exhibition…
The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is the only North Florida location to be selected to host *Journey Stories*.  All other Florida locations are in the south central and southern portions of the state…
*For more information about this event or about the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Museum, please visit their website at www.panhandlepioneer.org. *

Gerrell Room Exhibit Antique Housewares

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Thanks to Terri Gerrell for sharing her collection of antique housewares circa late 1800’s to mid 1900’s.

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