Wakulla County Historical Society

"A morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuable." Thomas Jefferson

Archive for the category “Musuem and Archives”

Buy A Brick, Leave A Legacy

20140519-000312-192274.jpg

Order Your Brick Today!

It is time to take advantage of our exciting project for the Museum & Archives. The brick pavers legacy project is now in full swing. Many of you have expressed interest in leaving a legacy by ordering brick pavers which will be placed in front of the Museum & Archives.  We plan to place an order for the bricks soon, so please get your forms turned in to us as soon as you can.  Many Wakulla County families will be represented here and I know you will want your family to be included.  These bricks can be done for loved ones who are deceased, those who are still living, a business, an organization, or whatever you’d like.  There are 3 lines with 20 spaces per line.  The cost for each brick is $100.  If you need any help or suggestions, just come by or call the Museum at 926-1110 and we will be glad to assist you.    

Advertisements

Do You Need Help Discovering Your Ancestors?

August Calendar

Wakulla County Museum and Archives has highly trained Genealogy specialist to assist you with finding your family.

Call 850-926-1110 to make an appointment.

What Does WCHS Offer?

Wakulla County Historical SocietyAND MUCH MORE…. Call us at 850-926-1110.

Share Your Historic Photos With The Historical Society

Hello Fellow Historians ,

Wakulla county Historical Society is developing a collection of historic photos on Pinterest. Visit our site and send us any photos to Facebook of local history or anything you might consider of value to add to our collection. Hope to see your ideas soon! Cathy Frank

Visit http://www.pinterest.com/24research/wakulla-historical-society

 

May 18, 1860: Lincoln Nominated For Presidency

Abraham Lincoln, a one-time U.S. representative from Illinois, is nominated for the U.S. presidency by the Republican National Convention meeting in Chicago, Illinois. Hannibal Hamlin of Maine was nominated for the vice presidency.

Lincoln, a Kentucky-born lawyer and former Whig representative to Congress, first gained national stature during his campaign against Democratic Senator Stephen Douglas of Illinois for a U.S. Senate seat in 1858. The senatorial campaign featured a remarkable series of public encounters on the slavery issue, known as the Lincoln-Douglas debates, in which Lincoln argued against the spread of slavery while Douglas maintained that each territory should have the right to decide whether it would become free or slave. Lincoln lost the Senate race, but his campaign brought national attention to the young Republican Party. In 1860, Lincoln won the party’s presidential nomination.

In the November election, Lincoln again faced Douglas, who represented the Northern faction of a heavily divided Democratic Party, as well as Southern Democrat John C. Breckinridge and Constitutional Union candidate John Bell. On November 6, 1860, Lincoln defeated his opponents with only 40 percent of the popular vote, becoming the first Republican to win the presidency. The announcement of Lincoln’s victory signaled the secession of the Southern states, which since the beginning of the year had been publicly threatening secession if the Republicans gained the White House.

By the time of Lincoln’s inauguration on March 4, 1861, seven states had seceded, and the Confederate States of America had been formally established, with Jefferson Davis as its elected president. One month later, the American Civil War began when Confederate forces under General P.G.T. Beauregard opened fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina.

WCHS Monthly Meeting To Be Held At St. Marks March 11, 7:00 P.M.

August Calendar

The #Wakulla County Historical Society program on Tuesday, March 11 (7:00 PM) will be held in Saint Marks at the San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park Museum. The presentation #“Wakulla County River Town, 1835-1865” will feature speaker Alva T. Stone describing the lives of her great, great grandfather, Dr. James M. Madden and other relatives who lived in Saint Marks, Port Leon, and New Port during the territorial and early statehood era. Ms. Stone, from Jacksonville, earned her bachelors and masters degrees at FSU. Upon retirement from libraries at FSU she remains in Tallahassee. There is no admission fee. For more information contact the WCHS at 24research@gmail.com, 850-926-1110, or visit the Museum at 24 High Drive on Courthouse Square in Crawfordville during business hours—Thursday and Friday 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM or Saturday 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM.

Get Your Ticket Today For “A Land Remembered”

Get Your Ticket Today For “A Land Remembered”.

Get Your Ticket Today For “A Land Remembered”

A Land Remembered

Seating for this event will be limited and there will be only one program, so get your tickets early.

Tickets: minimum donation of $10.00 each and are available:

All donations are tax deductible.

A Land Remembered by Patrick Smith (1927-2014) will be  hosted  by the Wakulla County Historical Society, February 27th at 7:00 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church.

Rick Smith, son of the author, will be presenting this educational program about his father, the story behind the story, excerpts from the story, videos and music. “A Land Remembered captured the soul of the state for so many of us,” said lawyer and longtime conservationist Clay Henderson. ”It was a picture of what Florida was like in its frontier and helped readers be able to value that. It has been very much part of the voice of the environmental movement…” January 27, 2014 by Jim Abbott, Orlando Sentinel Staff Writer

 

Visit the “Old Jail Shop”

Visit us at http://www.shop.wakullahistory.com/ to see what we have in our store. We have been updating the shopping cart, if you have any questions, contact us.

 

 

Visit The Museum To See Early Artifacts of Wakulla County

Drop by the Museum today for our Open House to see a fantastic exhibit. Read more about it…

By Sandra Vidak

We are pleased to officially open the Forbes Purchase-Hartfield Survey exhibit in the Betty Oaks Green Room at the Museum.

The story of the Forbes Purchase began in 1776 when three Tory sympathizers: William Panton, Thomas Forbes and John Leslie, arrived in St. Augustine. They had been prominent in the Indian trade in South Carolina and Georgia and sought similar opportunities in Florida. They did so as Panton Leslie & Company establishing headquarters in Pensacola. In 1792 Panton admitted John Forbes (the youngest brother of Thomas Forbes) to the firm as a junior partner and sent him to Alabama to handle the Chickasaw and Choctaw trade. By that time Panton Leslie & Company had a monopoly on Indian trade with the Upper and Lower Creek, Seminole, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Cherokee in the Southeast. The leather and fur trades were lucrative for the firm and in some years as many as two hundred fifty thousand deer hides and beaver pelts were traded and shipped to Europe. The firm’s success during Panton’s leadership, deteriorated after his death in 1801 as damage was inflicted on its commerce by William Augustus Bowles, the War of 1812, Andrew Jackson’s war on the Creek nation, and competition from American traders.
Read more…

Post Navigation